Tag Archives: Cycling

Guest Post: Le Race

Saturday, 28 March. If you are an amateur cyclist in Christchurch this is the day that all those laps of the Short Bays have been leading up to. The day where you can’t just pretend that you are out on a recovery ride but will actually have to suck it up for 100km two thirds of which involve some of the choicest hills those extinct volcanoes to the south have to offer. It’s time for Le Race.

The traditional sprint down Colombo St to be the first to, if not quite up, Dyers Pass Rd was tempered somewhat this year with the actual start line coming a couple of clicks away from where everybody had gathered in Cathedral Square. The less frantic start meant that there was an awful lot of shuffling forward before it was possible to click the second pedal in and try and get some warmth in the legs and a moderately raised heart rate before the climbing began. Usually going up this stretch I will have fifteen kilometres of warm up in me, not forty five minutes of commercial radio DJ patter in Christchurch autumn dawn temperatures. As someone who usually rides on my own or in small groups of four or five it was fairly overwhelming to have that many wheels around.

Found this on vorb.org.nz – In my CSC top going up Dyers Pass Rd

Found this on vorb.org.nz – In my CSC top going up Dyers Pass Rd

Continue reading

Advertisements

1 Comment

Filed under Cycling, Guest Post

Breaking News: Live Strong Swimmers

lance-tee

Lance Armstrong is out of retirement and already firing warning shots across bows ahead of his 2009 return to competitive cycling. In breaking news it’s been announced that Lance and his girlfriend Anna Hansen are expecting a child their first child together (Armstrong’s fourth). 

It’s no secret that Lance Armstrong has had a testicle surgically removed – and good on him, they’re the first target in a fight with a girl, and don’t get me started on the grooming – so it’s kind of remarkable to think that all of his children have been conceived post-lopping. 

Armstrong’s previous three children were conceived through in vitro fertilization with sperm frozen prior to Armstrong’s chemotherapy. I don’t understand in vitro – I mean, it sounds simple, but I saw Demolition Man, I know what happens when you mess with science. That said, one would have to assume the same can method was used for the new baby, right? 
Continue reading

3 Comments

Filed under Cycling, News

Round Taupo '08

image024

The morning dawned crisp, still and clear – conditions couldn’t really have been better, though the stinking heat of the previous day lingered in the memory, and caused the brilliant sky to be viewed with some trepidation. We rolled out from a rented bach on Parata st, only two kilometres from the start-line, but when you’ve the 160km of the Wattyl Lake Taupo Cycle Challenge™ ahead of you any extra effort seems wholly unnecessary.

In the decade since I last rolled out along these roads the event has swollen in size a little, but the main change has been in organisation. Now each entrant straps an electronic transponder to their bike, enabling a time correct to the micro-second, and ending the enduring practice of rounding down your time to cover your shame. The massed start has also been streamlined, so that when you actually cross the start line you’re riding straight away, rather than shuffling half-heartedly, Round The Bays-style, as was previously the case. It’s much improved, really, and means you feel the ride from the first, rather than it slipping into your consciousness as the roads clear out.

The roads twist on and up at relatively gentle gradients, though never with the respite of a downhill of any consequence to leaven things. Such is the nature of the event’s start that we’re passing and being passed constantly, a state of bunch-less flux that, frustratingly, persists for much of our event. Around the 10km mark Caroline Evers-Swindell blasts past, clad in black and never to be seen again, though it’s hard to feel bad about being beaten by a doule-gold medallist. Within a few kilometres a sign informs us that we’re atop Ben Lomond, the highest point of the race, topographically speaking, though the gently rising undulations that brought us to that point bear scant relation to the terrors that loom ahead, most notably the Waihi Hill at 100km, and the legendarily nasty Hatape Hill at 140km. Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under Cycling

Round Taupo ’08

image024

The morning dawned crisp, still and clear – conditions couldn’t really have been better, though the stinking heat of the previous day lingered in the memory, and caused the brilliant sky to be viewed with some trepidation. We rolled out from a rented bach on Parata st, only two kilometres from the start-line, but when you’ve the 160km of the Wattyl Lake Taupo Cycle Challenge™ ahead of you any extra effort seems wholly unnecessary.

In the decade since I last rolled out along these roads the event has swollen in size a little, but the main change has been in organisation. Now each entrant straps an electronic transponder to their bike, enabling a time correct to the micro-second, and ending the enduring practice of rounding down your time to cover your shame. The massed start has also been streamlined, so that when you actually cross the start line you’re riding straight away, rather than shuffling half-heartedly, Round The Bays-style, as was previously the case. It’s much improved, really, and means you feel the ride from the first, rather than it slipping into your consciousness as the roads clear out.

The roads twist on and up at relatively gentle gradients, though never with the respite of a downhill of any consequence to leaven things. Such is the nature of the event’s start that we’re passing and being passed constantly, a state of bunch-less flux that, frustratingly, persists for much of our event. Around the 10km mark Caroline Evers-Swindell blasts past, clad in black and never to be seen again, though it’s hard to feel bad about being beaten by a doule-gold medallist. Within a few kilometres a sign informs us that we’re atop Ben Lomond, the highest point of the race, topographically speaking, though the gently rising undulations that brought us to that point bear scant relation to the terrors that loom ahead, most notably the Waihi Hill at 100km, and the legendarily nasty Hatape Hill at 140km. Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under Cycling

Guest Post – Taming the 'Mandel

k1_k2

Let me say at the outset that the K2 and the K1 could be the single best one day cycling classic in the southern hemisphere.  It has so much going for it. Both are tough rides and this is the foundation stone to becoming a world-class race.
Don’t take me too seriously though, as I only did the K1.
This year the K1 finished in Tairua after starting in Coromandel. The forecast was for heavy rain pushed by strong north easterlies. Fortunately the rain held off and the north easterlies didn’t.
A big tailwind drove the 600 starters out of Coromandel and into the first of the big climbs. The Coromandel–Manaia hill is a bugger of a start. You haven’t got your legs and consequently your second wind before you hit it, well actually you don’t hit it, it hits you.
The hills in the Coromandel are big and the only thing to concern you is which ones are the biggest. This one is medium big but it claimed a lot of faux cyclists. People were pushing from halfway up. Considering they had gone 5kms with 95 to go they were in for a tough day. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Cycling

Guest Post – Taming the ‘Mandel

k1_k2

Let me say at the outset that the K2 and the K1 could be the single best one day cycling classic in the southern hemisphere.  It has so much going for it. Both are tough rides and this is the foundation stone to becoming a world-class race.
Don’t take me too seriously though, as I only did the K1.
This year the K1 finished in Tairua after starting in Coromandel. The forecast was for heavy rain pushed by strong north easterlies. Fortunately the rain held off and the north easterlies didn’t.
A big tailwind drove the 600 starters out of Coromandel and into the first of the big climbs. The Coromandel–Manaia hill is a bugger of a start. You haven’t got your legs and consequently your second wind before you hit it, well actually you don’t hit it, it hits you.
The hills in the Coromandel are big and the only thing to concern you is which ones are the biggest. This one is medium big but it claimed a lot of faux cyclists. People were pushing from halfway up. Considering they had gone 5kms with 95 to go they were in for a tough day. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Cycling